ICHIRO MIYASAKI 

Korean War


Private Company K, 180th Infantry Regt. 45th Infantry Division U.S. Army
Apr. 23, 1931 – June 12, 1952

 

Sugar City, Idaho

Ichiro “Roy” Miyasaki was born to Kitaro and Mitsu Miyasaki and spent his childhood working on a farm with his family in Idaho. He attended the Burton and Sugar Salem Schools and Ricks College. His athleticism, integrity, dependability and modesty earned him the honor of serving as high school senior class president. Miyasaki entered U.S. Army service in August, 1951 and received infantry training at Camp Roberts, California. In April, 1952, he departed for overseas duty.

While on a mission to take an area between two hills in Tumyong-Dong, Korea, Private Miyasaki and his platoon fought through heavy mortar, artillery and automatic weapons fire. Though wounded during this action he refused evacuation or medical treatment and continued the fight with his unit until they repelled the attacking enemy.

The Americans then countered the attack until a bunker holding six enemy soldiers halted their forward advance. Miyasaki rushed the bunker with an automatic rifle and neutralized it. This position was then assaulted repeatedly by the enemy while Miyasaki gallantly defended it. He was killed during one of the attacks. For his actions that day, Ichiro “Roy” Miyasaki received the second highest medal for heroism, the Distinguished Service Cross.

LOCATION

Japanese American National War Memorial Court

244 S. San Pedro St.
Los Angeles, CA 90012

MAILING ADDRESS

Veterans Memorial Court Alliance

1055 Wilshire Blvd, Suite 1890

Los Angeles, CA 90017 

 

CONTACT

info@memorialcourtalliance.org

310.378.0615

a 501(c)(3) tax exempt organization

(next to Japanese American Cultural and Community Center)

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This website and exhibition project was developed with support from the JA Community Foundation and with support from the California Humanities, a non-profit partner of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Visit www.calhum.org